Demystifying Arctic® apples’ modern science tools

Arctic® apples have been studied for over a decade and have the same nutrition and composition as their conventional counterparts – so why do GMO opponents say they contain dangerous viruses, contribute antibiotic resistance, and spread bacteria? The simple answer is that they’re lying to promote fear, though to be more precise, they’re using small pieces of partial truths and intentionally exaggerating or implying danger where there isn’t any. While we use apple genes to silence apple genes, the apple plantlets we introduce the nonbrowning trait into need a bit of help knowing what to do with these genes. We’ve
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Top five Arctic® apple myths

There’s a lot of misinformation out there about Arctic® apples, but as you probably already know, they’re actually just the same as their conventional counterparts until you bite, slice or bruise the fruit. Still, we want to ensure anyone wanting to know why they’re just as safe and healthful can readily find out. So, we’ve compiled the five most common myths about Arctic® apples, and why they don’t stand up to scrutiny: 1) Arctic® apples present a cross-pollination risk: We’re growers ourselves and have no intention of harming our neighbors. That’s why we’ve collected a massive amount of data proving cross-pollination
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How we introduce the nonbrowning trait in Arctic® apples

While a doctorate in molecular biology is needed to fully understand how biotechnology can create new foods like our Arctic® apples, even the basics can be tough to grasp without a background in science. Indeed that’s one of the main reasons biotechnology remains controversial, despite the most reputable scientific bodies agreeing on its safety and benefits. Even so, we do our best to simply explain the key concepts of how we make apples “Arctic”: When Arctic® apples are growing in the orchard or are part of your lunch, they are essentially the same as their conventional counterparts until you bruise, bite or
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Exploring the marker gene used in Arctic® apples

As you can read about in our FAQ section, the process required to transform a conventional apple to an Arctic® variety necessitates the use of a marker gene that makes the plant tissue resistant to the antibiotic kanamycin. This process requires a doctorate in molecular biology to fully comprehend, so we turn to our head scientist John Armstrong, who just happens to have these credentials.  Should people worry that the insertion of our marker gene may add a new protein to Arctic® apples? The simple answer is no, as there are no proteins expressed in Arctic® apples that aren’t in conventional apples.
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