The next wave of biotech crops

Biotech crops have been widespread in the marketplace for nearly twenty years and have had great success – but the best is yet to come! We are better equipped to deal with the numerous agricultural challenges we face due to our advancements in understanding plant genomics. First and foremost among these challenges is a rapidly rising global population. It’s been well-documented that, according to the UN, the global population is projected to rise to ~9 billion by 2040 and the world will need “at least 50 percent more food” by 2030. Feeding a couple billion extra people will be no
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OSF’s Neal Carter presents TEDx talk

Recently, I was given the fantastic opportunity of delivering a presentation on agricultural biotechnology and its benefits at a TEDx event in Penticton, BC. I firmly believe in the value biotechnology can offer the agriculture industry and the global community, so I was excited to be asked to share these views through an amazing outlet like TEDx. I am convinced of the benefits biotechnology provides our global population, including saving lives. I have a unique perspective from working around the world as a bioresource engineer for nearly three decades, in addition to my experience as an orchardist and as the
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The future is bright for antioxidants

Almost everyone who goes grocery shopping has seen a slew of antioxidant products spring up on the shelves over the past few years. Ten years ago, most people had never even heard of an “antioxidant”, but according to a recent report, “29 percent of U.S. adults are seeking out high-antioxidant groceries”. What’s more, this number is expected to climb even higher over the next ten years, as consumers gain further knowledge of the numerous potential health benefits of antioxidants, such as anti-cancer and immunity-boosting properties. While plenty of cereals, breads, nutritional supplements and even beauty care products now emphasize antioxidant
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How’d we “make” a nonbrowning apple?

When my friends find out about my work with Arctic® Apples, invariably one of the first questions they ask is: How’d we do that? That is, how’d we “make” a nonbrowning apple? Here’s what I tell them: First, a quick biochemistry lesson.  When the cell of a typical apple is ruptured – for example, by biting, slicing or bruising – polyphenol oxidase (PPO) found in one part of the cell mixes with polyphenolics found in another part of the cell. (PPO is a plant enzyme. Polyphenolics are one of the many types of chemical substrates that serve various purposes, including
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