Arctic, conventional and organic apple trees can coexist

One of our website FAQs addresses the topic of co-existence: Will Arctic® apple trees be a threat to conventional or organic apple trees, by crossbreeding with trees growing near them? For a variety of reasons, the answer is “NO!” Admittedly, co-existence has been an issue for some genetically-modified row crops. However, apples are very different from row crops, so it is not accurate to draw comparisons. First, apple trees aren’t “weedy” – they don’t escape and grow in the wild like some other crops can. For millennia we apple growers have created new apple trees via vegetative propagation, not by planting
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Apple industry challenges will require biotechnology solutions

Eating an apple is already easy; growing apples, on the other hand, is not. First, there’s the weather – hail in the summer, killing cold in the winter. Second, apple trees and their fruits are also attacked by pests at every turn, including insects, rodents, wildlife, fungi, viruses and bacteria. Growers like me use cultural practices to help control some of those pests, such as pruning and training trees, mowing to limit cover and disrupting insects’ mating cycles with pheromones. Even then, it is virtually impossible to grow apples, conventional or organic, without the use of some type of pesticide
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How does a genetically engineered food get to the Canadian market?

In December 2011, OSF began the government review process that is required to take a new food product, like Arctic® Apples, to market in Canada. In Canada, two agencies share responsibility for regulating plants and plant foods created through biotechnology: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Health Canada. CFIA ensures the safety of “plants with novel traits” for the environment and use as animal feed. Health Canada ensures that “novel foods” are safe for human consumption. Both agencies require substantial data to prove the similarity and safety of a genetically modified plant/plant food to its conventional counterpart. Previous reviews of
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